Fishing Report - FRA Blog

Sages of Summer

Thursday August 8th, 2013 - 8:32am

With the upcoming Sages of Summer Event on August 24, 2013 featuring Jerry Siem (Chief Rod Designer) and Diana Rudoph (Sage Consultant and 7-time IGFA record holder) it might be informative to know a bit more about Sage and its philosophy.  A story written by Tristan Baurick, Wisdom of the Sage: Fishing rod maker flexes with the times, for the Kitsap Sun is worth a read.

"Sage is moving to Poulsbo. Sage is moving to Renton. Sage is moving to China.  Travis Campbell has heard all the rumors. After three decades of manufacturing high-end fly fishing rods on Bainbridge Island, the growing company is cutting costs, packing up, and moving on — or so the stories go.  "I don't ever see us leaving Bainbridge," said Campbell, Sage's president. "At the end of the day, I think we can make a better product here."  Sage is a rare thing in America today, and an even rarer thing on Bainbridge: a company that actually makes stuff" Read full article


Feather Brain

Wednesday August 7th, 2013 - 12:12pm




Its been a long wait but Drew's book has finely been released by Stackpole.  Drew is one of the most enthusiastic and creative saltwater fishermen I know.  Here's a little preview of what to expect

SAGE DAYS

Saturday August 3rd, 2013 - 7:58am


Make sure to mark you calendar for Aug. 23rd & 24th as we have a big weekend planned to cap off the summer! We'll kick it off with a Sage VIP night, where we'll give away a new Sage Method by the guy who designed it, Jerry Siem! Then we'll follow that up with a special day with seven I.G.F.A. fly division record holder and Sage rod advisory member Diana Rudolph.


A COUPLE OF COMMENTS ABOUT THE METHOD

Sage Manufacturing recently announced the release of its 2014 premier collection of high performance rods called the METHOD series. These ultra-fast fly rods use Sage’s proprietary Konnetic technology. The METHOD delivers high line speeds and tight loops for extreme distance and wind-cutting casts all while maintaining critical accuracy and feel.

“Our newest high performance rods will make any caster better but will help experienced casters notch exceptional casts with regularity.” Jerry Siem

FRA is one of the first shops in the country to carry these new rods....find out more about them from the man responsible for their design.

Seducing Large Fish with Barr's Meat Whistle

Wednesday July 31st, 2013 - 9:33am

The Largemouth pictured above was caught on Monday of this week by Erik Staub in a lake adjacent to Greeley, CO

John Barr's Meat Whistle by Umpqua is a popular fly pattern for Bass and Trout.   John originally developed the fly for bass fishing in Colorado to replicate the pig n' jig used by conventional tackle anglers.  However, it is equally effective for trout and other species.  While it is designed to imitate a crayfish it can be tied in a variety of colors and sizes to imitate small baitfish.  The materials used produce a considerable amount of motion and the conehead cuts quickly through the water to get the fly down fast.

The key to using this fly is to fish it slow; bumping it along the bottom.

Recipe:

Hook: Gamakatsu 90 degree jig hook #1/0
Cone: Large Tungsten Copper Cone
Thread: UTC 140 denier, rusty brown
Ribbing: Brassie sized UTC Ultra Wire, Copper Brown
Body: Copper Sparkle Braid
Wing: Rusty Brown rabbit strip
Legs: Pumpkin Barred Sili Legs
Flash: Copper Flashabou
Collar: Brown Marabou

Note:  There are a lot of variations to the above listing but the basic construction and profile remains the same


In 2011 John Barr posted some comments about fishing the Meat Whistle  on the RIO Products web site

"I cast the fly and allow it to sink. While it is sinking I am watching the line tip or the line closest to me that I can see for any little twitches or movement that can occur when a fish takes the fly. If there is movement in the line I strip set hard. If the fly sinks to the bottom without a take, I let it sit and start my retrieve. The retrieve can be a series of hand twists slow strips or a combination of the two, with many pauses. While retrieving I don’t pinch the line against the grip. I drape the line over the middle finger of my rod hand. Takes are detected by feeling anything different in the finger that the line is draped over. The line can impart a subtle tick, feels like something pecking your finger, or just feel tighter on the finger. If the line feels different I strip set hard. If I don’t hook a fish during the retrieve at the end I sweep the rod which can trigger a grab from a fish following, and pick up and cast again. The long leader allows the fly and leader to sink while the floating line stays on or near the surface. The floating line lifts the fly off the bottom when stripped and allows it to fall during the pause, and line movement can be detected when a fish takes.
When warm water fishing for bass, incidental catches of other species on the Meat Whistle are fairly common. Many of my largest perch, brim, carp and catfish have been caught while fishing a 3/0 Meat Whistle for bass.

I still love ripping a big black and blue Whistle in the late evening and feeling that jolt when a fish savagely attacks, and I still swing and strip, but the Passive technique has produced so many trout and bass, especially large fish, that I employ it regularly."


New Bass Fly to be Featured

Wednesday July 24th, 2013 - 10:28am



I received the above picture of a 25-inch Wiper caught by Erik Staub from Greeley, Colorado and it brought to mind a new fly pattern, the Straw Boss, that we will be featuring in the July issue of the Front Range Anglers Newsletter.  Its absolutely deadly on these fish and for Largemouth or Smallmouth Bass.  Make sure you don't miss this upcoming edition.

The Bass below was taken on the Straw Boss on Friday of last week in a local pond.