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Flows continue to drop and the water is very clear again, which means summer has arrived and things are about to get incredible in the Park. On this trip we fished Glacier Creek and Cub Creek and both proved to be very productive.

Now that the water is dropping, you can add more variety to your offerings in terms of types of bugs. We found a few fish on san juan patterns, but the majority of the fish came to the net on RS2s.

With the water clearing, the fish are also starting to look up more. A dry dropper rig is now a good choice, with a
Chubby Chernobyl, Hippie Stomper or other terrestrial attractor up top and a nymph about three feet below. Some good options for the dropper include RS2s, Hare’s ears and various midge patterns.

With the lower flows the fish are spookier, so good approaches and casts will help to increase your catch rate.

Nathan Mitch RMNP 1

A colorful wild brown trout in RMNP.

Mitch-Nathan-RMNP-2

Excitement swells, even if it’s not a world record!

Reported By: Adam SpoerlArray
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The forecast called for a hot summer day, so I spent a few hours wet wading some of the common spots on Bear Creek . I started out at O’Fallon park and when I arrived I was immediately greeted by plenty of PMD’s and Caddis up in the air. After observing for a bit though, I never did spot anything coming up to take advantage of it. I started out with a dry dropper rig, consisting of a chubby and a san juan, and worked a few likely runs. I did get a couple of swipes at the chubby, but in the end couldn’t convince the fish to commit. The San Juan pulled a couple of fish, but for the runs I was working, more fish should have been coming to the net. Now that run-off is winding down, it’s nice to start to add some variety to the starting lineup! I switched over to a jigged hare’s ear and a Blue Poison Tung on a euro-rig and immediately got into a few fish. After about an hour of catching 6-10″ Browns I moved downstream to Lair O The Bear.

The parking lot was in full summer mode, with hordes of families heading out onto the trail. I didn’t have a ton of time to venture too far to escape the crowds, so one of the hardest parts was finding fishable water that wasn’t already occupied by kids throwing rocks or dogs taking a swim! I stuck with my euro-rig and worked some of the faster pocket water, which is where I had the most success, especially with the larger fish.

Throughout the day I was switching between quite a few patterns, with fish coming to the net on PMD nymphs, Drake Nymphs, Stone patterns and Caddis pupa.

Overall, Bear Creek is still running a little too high, and fishing wasn’t as good as it will be in a few weeks. If you’re looking for solitude or larger fish, this probably isn’t the place for you.

Reported By: Erik MyhreArray
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Spent a couple of hours exploring Clear Creek Canyon and unfortunately the hardest part was just finding a place to fish. Even though it’s started to drop, it still has a long ways to go before it’s back to a good summer flow. Fish were willing to eat when I could find slower water, but at this level (1150 CFS) and with the gradient in the canyon, there just isn’t much good holding water that you can get to. There were some places that had nice water along the edges, but the brush was so thick and high that trying to fish it from the bank wasn’t possible.The majority of the canyon is just straight whitewater still.

With other Front Range watersheds starting to come into shape quickly and more and more of the high country opening up daily, I’d recommend spending time elsewhere until things come down quite a bit more.

Reported By: Erik MyhreArray
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The current flow of 120cfs, which seems to be holding, is optimal. The water below the dam has cleared and the dry fly action from mid day on has been great! It appears that some of the missing insects are coming back.

Midday try using Baetis patterns and then switch to caddis after 2pm. Evening caddis hatch might be stellar and worth sticking around to see!

Brett with Brown on Big Thompson

First time fly fisherman Brett with a beautiful wild Brown caught on an Elk Hair Caddis in the Big Thompson!

Reported By: Wallace WestfeldtArray
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Flows have finally started to drop and are back to their seasonal average. Although you can still get hits on pink San Juans and variations, insects are a better bet now.The majority of fish caught recently have come to net on small Royal Chubby Chernobyls and Blue Poison Tungs.

With the lower flows the fish are spookier, so good approaches and casts will help to increase your catch rate.

First Time Fly Fisherman Bill with a Cub Creek Brookie

First Time Fly Fisherman Bill with a Cub Creek Brookie

Reported By: Wallace WestfeldtArray
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It was a perfect summer evening to go check out SBC below Gross Revervoir. Flows have dropped in the past week, and it’s just on the cusp of getting really good! Flows were around 325 CFS, which is still moving pretty good, but opens up enough water to make it interesting. Once it drops to 300 and below, look for SBC to be a great after work option!

I primarily concentrated my efforts behind any structure and in back eddies. Some of the fish were right on the bank, others were out just on the edge of the fast current. The higher water seems to be putting the bigger fish at ease, as the averages size of the fish caught were larger than normal.

My rig consisted of a weighted worm pattern and a jigged hare’s ear dropped about three feet below a small Chubby Chernobyl. The majority of the fish came to net on the worm pattern, but the #16 hare’s ear saw it’s share of action as well. Had probably half a dozen refusals on the chubby, with two or three fish that committed.

All in all a wonderful summer night with plenty of colorful wild rainbows to hand.

Reported By: Erik MyhreArray
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