Blue River

Latest Guide Report

08-15-2018

Report by: Randy Hanner

The Blue is in its “usual” summertime flow.  PMD’s are hatching now as well as a few sporadic caddis flying around. Dry Fly fishing can be very good right especially if you target rising fish. You’ll still have the best success nymphing with Barr PMD emergers, small pheasant tails, top secret midges, and WD40’s. If the fishing gets tough, throw on a Charlies mysis. Even if there aren’t large numbers coming through the dam, you still may be able to pick up the odd fish or two on a mysis. Try to avoid bright indicators if at all possible.

Guide Rating
3/5
Weather Experienced

Clear
Temperature:
Wind Conditions: Calm
Precipitation: None
Water Observations

Clear
Water Temperature:
Flow Level: CFS
Runoff? Clear

Blue River Water Flow Graphs

About Blue River Fly Fishing

For Denver area flyfishers, the Blue River, which rests just an hour-and-a-half west of the city off I-70, is an excellent after-work and short weekend option. However, due to its location, it can suffer from crowding.

Despite its location and a good population of trout, not many people consider the Blue their favorite river. However, for those who know the Blue, “Big trout,” “Broken tippet” and “the one that came off,” are all phrases that are commonly heard as those anglers head home from the river.

It hasn’t always been that way; improvements on the Blue over the last four or five years have benefited the fishery. New catch-and-release regulations to strengthen the population of larger fish and the fact that the rainbows, browns, and brookies in this river have bellied up to a diet of seafood – a white shrimp called Mysis – have played a big part in these improvements.

The Blue below Dillon Reservoir is not a typical Colorado tailwater. In fact, fishing the Blue below Dillon is a somewhat urban experience – it flows through Silverthorne, and those fast food joints, gas stations, and factory outlet stores make a strange setting for a blue ribbon trout stream.